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On the Freud Watch: Public Memoirs

: Roazen, Paul

This is a collection of personal pieces. The Introduction deals with Paul Roazen’s experiences attending clinical case conferences at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center in 1964-65, and what he learned about psychoanalytic psychology there. Chapter 1 makes a general statement about his outlook on why studying the past matters. Chapter 2 deals with a particular psychological explanation that his friend Charles Rycroft offered for why psychoanalysts are characteristically anti-historical. Chapter 3 discusses Roazen’s take on the problem of Freud’s analysis of his daughter Anna, a matter Roazen first brought to light in 1969. Chapter 4 deals with the rarely discussed question of training analyses. Chapter 5 contains Roazen’s efforts to deal with the way the founder of the Freud Archives, Kurt Eissler, launched attacks on his work. Chapter 6 tries to show how Roazen thinks Dickens’s “David Copperfield” can be an example of creative ablation in a great novelist’s life. Chapter 7 discusses O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey” from the contrasting viewpoints of Freud and Jung, both of whom can be said to have directly influenced O’Neill. Chapter 8 consists of some 26 letters to the editor that Roazen published, including the circumstances and objectives he had with each. Chapter 9 covers his take on the recently published Freud correspondences with both Ferenczi and Abraham. Chapter 10 is an over-view of Freud’s impact on political and social thought, embracing the traditions of socialism, conservatism, and liberalism. Chapter 11 includes Roazen’s use of psychological thinking in order to follow questions connection with Canadian political life as he experienced it. Chapter 13 deals with Roazen’s understanding of who has won and lost in the Freud Wars of this past century. And Chapter 14 concludes with a discussion of how he thinks Freud’s concept of neurosis was intended to convey his understanding of a specifically human privilege. The short epilogue closes with a personal account of the signifiance of a small beach in Roazen’s childhood. Paul Roazen, educated as a political theorist at Harvard, Chicago, and Oxford, has spent his career approaching psychoanalysis as an aspect of intellectual history. Issues of a moral and philosophic nature remain central to the tradition of thought that Freud initiated, and help account for the unfortunate sectarianism that has afflicted the field. Read more…

Asylum to Anarchy

: Baron, Claire.

Following the classic work on asylums by Erving Goffman, this is a studyby Claire Baron of democratic tyranny, a tyranny of the therapeutic, in which naked power replaced the ideals of a therapeutic community designed to eliminate hierarchy and bureaucracy. It is a detailed study of a London day hospital, a model community for psychoanalytic treatment in a democratic setting which went badly wrong in its attempt to capture the momentum of de-institutionalization in mental health care. It is also a critique of power for our time, as it moves well beyond a case study to analyse shifts in social control. Read more…

Autism: Debates and Testimonies

: Ribas, Denys.

Childhood autism is a fascinating and disturbing disorder that has given rise to contentious debates, which often end in impasse. Here, Denys Ribas reviews this enigmatic condition, focusing on the work of Hans Asperger, which paved the way for institutional care and has wider importance than has often been recognized, and on testimonies provided by former sufferers from autism and on the analytic psychotherapy of a child. The author examines all the theories under discussion today, including developments in genetics and the access to symbolisation and, in a constant concern with clinical practice, instigates a constructive debate between the traditionally conflicting views of psychoanalysis and the cognitive sciences. Written in a lucid style that explains the concepts with reference to a glossary, this book will be relevant not only to students, professionals and parents who are dealing with the psychic difficulties of autistic children and the challenge of treating them, but also to anyone with a general interest in the development of thought and language. Read more…

A Doctor’s Dilemma: Stress and the Role of the Carer

: Holland, John.

The work of a general practitioner can be highly stressful and the source of much of the stress is often the conflict that arises between the needs of the doctor and those of the patient. A doctor has to face many common but disturbing situations such as dealing with highly distressed people, seductive behaviour and anger in the consultation as well as the demands of relationships with fellow professionals. This book examines and probes the forces that impact on the carer in order to understand and defuse the stress they cause. The author, John Holland, is a counsellor trainer as well as doctor, uses psychotherapeutic understandings to gain insight through the many examples he gives. Read more…

The General Practitioner, Patients and Their Feelings: Exploring Emotions Behind the Physical Symptoms

: Zalidis, Sotiris.

The explosion of knowledge in the fields of neurobiology, psychology and genetics has made it no longer helpful to discuss whether or not a particular illness is psychosomatic. This title by Sotiris Zalidis provides an introduction to psychosomatics for counsellors and psychotherapists who want to learn about the psychologically informed management of their patients’ physical symptoms. It is also intended for general practitioners who are interested in the role of emotions in the formation of physical symptoms. Read more…

Self-esteem: Research, Theory and Practice

: Mruk, Christopher

Everyone knows what lack of self-esteem is – a factor often found in cases of depression, abusive relationship, personality disorders and suicidal behaviour. But what exactly is self-esteem? Can it treally be developed or enchanced past a person’s formative years? In a cogent analysis of the recent explosion of research and literature on the enhancement of self-esteem, this book by Christopher Mruk answers these questions clearly and concisely on both theoretical and practical levels. It is recommended for all students. Read more…

Psychometrics Primer

: Kline, Paul

This text by Paul Kline provides an introduction to psychometrics. The central chapters describe the nature of scientific measurement, the way psychometric tests are constructed and illustrate intelligence, aptitude and other psychological tests. Read more…

Creative Choice in Hypnosis

: http://www.freeassociationpublishing.com/products/creative-choice-in-hypnosis/

More than any other individual, Milton Erickson has been responsible for shaping the modern view of hypnosis. His great contribution came from his ability to locate an individual’s inner resources for coping creativelywith the real problems of everyday life. Erickson himself endured tow bouts of polio and was in a wheelchair throughout much of his later life. He learned to use the healing methods of self-hypnosis to deal with his handicaps and uncover ways of experiencing living at more profound levels. His delight in teaching these methods of self-healing are clearly shown in these transcriptions of his seminars, workshops and lectures. Volume IV explores some important questions through a presentation, never before published, of Erickson’s own hypnotic workshops and demonstrations: is hypnosis a process of manipulation or facilitation? does the hypnotherapist control people? does the hypnotherapist simply give people permission to heal themselves? The authoritarian-permissive paradox of hypnotherapy is most evidednt in Erickson’s use of the double bind. Volume IV takes the reader on a journey that recaptures his evoluiton of the therapeutic double bind: from a technique based on an authoritarian concept of ‘illusory choice’, to a modern vision of the double bind as a ‘free choice among comparable alternatives’. This new vision represents a profound shift in attitude: creative choice, not control or manipulation, as the inherenet agent of healing in psychotherapy. Read more…

Contemporary Perspectives in Psychotherapy and Homosexualities

: Shelley, Christopher

Most psychotherapy training programmes don’t incorporate elements which examine the special needs of the gay and lesbian populations. It is therefore questionable whether practitioners possess the basic necessary skills for assessing and employing interventions based on sexually sensitive material. An unexamined and untrained approach to working with homosexual populations can no longer be tolerated. This book edited by Christopher Shelley addresses some of the incoherence that exists in this field. The contributors propose theories and models of practice that will be more beneficial to the therapeutic needs of homosexual clients. Their accounts represent a significant step towards a better understanding of the needs of this client group. Read more…