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The Politics of Attachment: Towards a Secure Society

: Kraemer, Sebastian; Roberts, Jane

Growing insecurity and uncertainty seem to characterise the human condition at the end of the twentieth century. The contributors to The Politics of Attachment, edited by Sebastian Kraemer and  Jane Roberts – are all distinguished authorities from a variety of backgrounds in public, professional and academic life – sharing a common conviction that we all have a powerful need to belong, to be attached to people, places and projects, and that social and political processes must reflect that. The writers draw on recent research and debate in developmental psychology and political science to provide a unique dialogue between the psychological and the social – a political grasp of ordinary human needs. Read more…

Cyborg Worlds: The Military Information Society

: Levidow, Lev

Lev Levidow has been Managing Editor of Science as Culture since its inception in 1987, and of its predecessor, the Radical Science Journal. He is Research Fellow at the Open University. He has been involved in the Palestine Solidarity Campaign. Collection of 7 essays + Introduction on military technology, cyborg soldiers, infotech, the post-Fordist interface between man & machine, automated war, & much more. Read more…

Black Children in the Public Care System

: Barn, Ravinder

The author, Ravinder Barn, has based her study on empirical data collected from a survey of an inner-city Local Authority Social Services Department. Over 500 case histories have been analysed and evidence gathered from interviews with social workers, parents and children to provide a well-balanced and unique insight into the care careers of black children. The significance of race and racism on the decisions made by social workers is underlined by the revealing statistics which arise from this study. The book highlights the urgent need for an increased awareness of the requirements of black children in care, and provides essential reading for all students and practising social workers. Read more…

Social Work with Black Children and Their Families (Child care policy & practice series)

: Ahmed, Shama; Cheetham, Juliet; Small, John

As part of a series on child care policy, this book describes the situation of black families in Britain who face many problems stemming from both racial discrimination and from the aftermath of migration: the latter, while it opened up new opportunities, also imposed strains felt beyond the generation of people who were newcomers to Britain. The welfare services have not always dealt with the problems of poverty, poor housing and unemployment in appropriate ways. Disproportionate numbers of black children are in care, with less chance of reunion with their parents than white children. Care provided by local authorities may also be insensitive to diverse ethnic backgrounds and cultural needs. Only recently have black substitute parents been found for black children. Welfare services for young offenders have also not been operated adequately for black adolescents, so disproportionate numbers are in youth custody establishments. In the early 1980s, social services began to recognize these problems and this book describes developments and explores possible ways of providing services which are appropriate to Britain’s multi-racial population. The contributors seeks to describe practical ways of meeting needs, and their implications for black families and the practitioners and administrators who work with them. Juliet Cheetham is the author of “Social Work and Ethnicity”. Edited by Shama Ahmed, Juliet Cheetham and John Small. Read more…

Police, Drugs and Community

: Collison, Mike

Drawing on rich ethnographic data gathered by observing a force level drug squad at work, Mike Collison’s book deals with the strategic, cultural and political effects of contemporary drug policing and sets them against a broader canvas. Collison argues that current approaches to drug law enforcement endemically produce and reproduce failure, meanwhile realising undesirable forms of policing in a democratic society. Read more…

The Alcohol Report

: Plant, Martin; Cameron, Douglas

“The Alcohol Report”, edited by Martin Plant and Douglas Cameron sets out to provide, in non-technical terms, a considered, authoritative and informative review of some of the key topics likely to interest those with a serious interest in the facts about alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems. In addition, it is hoped that “The Alcohol Report” will be helpful to a wide range of people whose work is likely to bring them into contact with drinking and “problem drinking”. “The Alcohol Report” should also be of interest to those with personal experience of alcohol problems, the drinkers themselves, their friends and family members. The topics covered in this book include the negative and positive effects of alcohol, the effects of heavy drinking during pregnancy, reasons why alcohol problems develop, national and international trends in alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems, the economics of the alcohol market and the costs of alcohol problems, harm minimization strategies, health promotion, treatment, support and counselling for problem drinkers. The latter include both “conventional approaches” such as psychologically-oriented treatments and home detoxification, together with complementary therapies. Read more…

Dealing with Drink: Alcohol and Social Policy in Contemporary England

: Thom, Betsy.

This work examines the social, political and health policy contexts within which alcohol treatment policy has emerged and changed since 1950. Three themes are highlighted as particularly relevant to an examination of policy trends: The emergence and evolution of a “policy community” spear-headed by psychiatrists in the 1960s but broadening to include other profession and the voluntary sector by the 1980s. Betsy Thom’s text traces professional changes and tensions and their effects on the formation and implementation of policy into the ’90s. The role of research which influenced the nature and direction of policy. Changing approaches to alcohol treatment reveal the increasing uses of research as the rationale for social and health policy decisions and illustrate the move towards a contractor relationship between research workers and policy makers. The changing conceptions and competing paradigms of the problem tracing the effect of ideological shifts on the balance between treatment responses and prevention and public health approaches to complex social medical problems such as alcoholism. Within these broad themes, the text portrays the pressures and tensions on government departments, the efforts to secure consensus in the formulation and implementation of policy and the importance of understanding the historical-social contexts from which policy emerges. Read more…

Cultural Collapse

: Weatherill, Rob

At a time when the relations between morality, the social fabric and the inner world are causing distress throughout the world, Rob Weatherill provides a searching study of the growing impoverishment of life in Western society. He plumbs the depths of the ways our culture impoverishes and does violence to our private selves and spaces. He addresses himself to the role of ideals in psychoanalysis and brings a Kleinian perspective to bear on the schizoid nature of modern culture; the emptiness of the addict; the crisis in education; feminism and the shattering of male narcissism. Read more…