GRID VIEW LIST VIEW

Social Workers: The Students’ View

: Mullan, Bob

Government ministers, social work managers and university academics all strive to shape social work education and training.  But what do social work students and newly qualified social workers themselves think about their education, their tutors and practical training?  This book focuses on the student experience. Dr. Robert Mullan has taught social work students at a number of UK universities, including Leicester, Nottingham, Chichester and East Anglia. Read more…

Community Care in Practice

: Hunter, Susan, Davidson, Ralph

The new patterns and policies for community care which have been phased in since April 1991 present both a stimulus and a challenge to the development of social policy and social work provision. This book is a collection of essays edited by Susan Hunter and Ralph Davidson which provide an introduction to many of the complex issues facing social workers when planning and implementing these initiatives. The first half of the book focuses on the theory of community care, the expectations of both service providers and consumers and the philosophy behind the provision of care in the community. The second half examines the implementation, including details on the planning, managing, packaging and monitoring community care. The contributors discuss the relationship between the statutory bodies and the voluntary services and examine their changing roles in relation to the provision of community care. Read more…

On the Freud Watch: Public Memoirs

: Roazen, Paul

This is a collection of personal pieces. The Introduction deals with Paul Roazen’s experiences attending clinical case conferences at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center in 1964-65, and what he learned about psychoanalytic psychology there. Chapter 1 makes a general statement about his outlook on why studying the past matters. Chapter 2 deals with a particular psychological explanation that his friend Charles Rycroft offered for why psychoanalysts are characteristically anti-historical. Chapter 3 discusses Roazen’s take on the problem of Freud’s analysis of his daughter Anna, a matter Roazen first brought to light in 1969. Chapter 4 deals with the rarely discussed question of training analyses. Chapter 5 contains Roazen’s efforts to deal with the way the founder of the Freud Archives, Kurt Eissler, launched attacks on his work. Chapter 6 tries to show how Roazen thinks Dickens’s “David Copperfield” can be an example of creative ablation in a great novelist’s life. Chapter 7 discusses O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey” from the contrasting viewpoints of Freud and Jung, both of whom can be said to have directly influenced O’Neill. Chapter 8 consists of some 26 letters to the editor that Roazen published, including the circumstances and objectives he had with each. Chapter 9 covers his take on the recently published Freud correspondences with both Ferenczi and Abraham. Chapter 10 is an over-view of Freud’s impact on political and social thought, embracing the traditions of socialism, conservatism, and liberalism. Chapter 11 includes Roazen’s use of psychological thinking in order to follow questions connection with Canadian political life as he experienced it. Chapter 13 deals with Roazen’s understanding of who has won and lost in the Freud Wars of this past century. And Chapter 14 concludes with a discussion of how he thinks Freud’s concept of neurosis was intended to convey his understanding of a specifically human privilege. The short epilogue closes with a personal account of the signifiance of a small beach in Roazen’s childhood. Paul Roazen, educated as a political theorist at Harvard, Chicago, and Oxford, has spent his career approaching psychoanalysis as an aspect of intellectual history. Issues of a moral and philosophic nature remain central to the tradition of thought that Freud initiated, and help account for the unfortunate sectarianism that has afflicted the field. Read more…

Discipline and Governmentality at Work

: Winiecki, Donald .J

How we know ourselves, how we are known by the institutions in which we work, and how we are known by our co-workers and our families is increasingly affected in a constantly changing network of technologies and strategies. As we enter the 21st century, these include computers and telecommunications, as well as management, ‘psy’ fields, and accounting. In the workplace, these technological forms are lashed together into systems and strategies that reflect a form of rationality and allow norms for seeing, representing and knowing work and workers to arise. These norms and forms produce distinctly modern forms of subjectivity, ‘truth’ and power to make workers into subjects. Tertiary (service) labour is the fastest growing form of paid work in the economic catchment of the West. Mediation of labour through computers and telecommunication is also increasing at a remarkable rate. Nonetheless, there are few detailed analyses of subjectivity in technology-mediated tertiary labour. Drawn from ethnographic research using post-structural analytics, Donald Winiecki’s book describes how a collection of technologies is taken up in a common form of tertiary labour – call centres – to produce ‘truth’, knowledge, power and modern forms of subjectivity and social subjects. It also challenges assumptions of Marxian and management theory by demonstrating that workers are neither dominated nor liberated, rather how they are made responsible for and caught up in the apparatus that renders them as subjects. This book provides a detailed look at the ‘genealogy of subjectivity’ at work. It shows ‘how we are now’ as a population whose selves and subjectivity are produced face-to-face with technology-mediated systems. Read more…

Peace Fire: Fragments from the Israel-Palestine Story

: Casey, Ethan; Hilder, Paul.

Events in the Middle East have rushed forward so dizzyingly since mid-2000 that even close observers could be pardoned for losing track, not to mention hope. In this book, 107 contributors offer individual perspectives on the deepening crisis in Israel-Palestine, providing a ground-level understanding, from every angle, of the collapse of peace. “Peace Fire” aligns the chronology of recent history with personal diaries alongside thoughtful analyses – some passionate, others disinterested (and a few that have already been proved wrong) – and weaves together the intemperate opinions, anger, hatred and confusion of the crisis. It spreads out from personal experiences of tragedy, conflict and hope at the epicentre to touch on the alarming global ripple effects, with contributors ranging from those on both sides directly affected to expert observers around the world. “Peace Fire” is a collective diary of the Israel-Palestine conflict in its greatest crisis for 35 years. The recent maelstrom on the West Bank has dominated the world’s newspapers but left people feeling powerless and uncomprehending. This book, edited by Ethan Casey and Paul Hilder, shows what is driving the crisis and whether there’s a way out of the abyss. Read more…

In Nicaragua

: Kovel, Joel.

Joel Kovel’s reflections – personal, candid and touching – on Sandinista Nicaragua. Amongst issues discussed are: the position of women, gender relations, the empowering role of liberation theology and the struggle to develop an adequate mental health service. Read more…

Doctors on the Edge: General Practitioners, Health and Learning in the Inner-city

: West, Linden.

This title focuses on the work, well-being and lives of doctors during a period of constant change and crisis in the National Health Service and of growing anxiety about levels of clinical competence and accountability. The alarming number of well-publicized “failures” by medics – at the Royal Bristol Children’s Hospital, the Kent and Canterbury Hospital, for instance, and the appalling breach of trust by Dr Harold Shipman -the Manchester General Practitioner found guilty of murdering 15 patients – has led to a Government enquiry into the accountability of the profession. All, it seems, is far from well among medics. Linden West’s text shows how GPs are responding to their changing roles in a changing society; and how such responses may be understood in a context of whole life histories as well as within the norms of medical culture. Doctors, as a profession, have tended, for many reasons, to hide behind a professional curtain in what can be a very “male” world. Some matters – surrounding the emotional well-being of doctors – are hard for doctors to talk about in this world where, too often, they have been taught to cope, like “good men should”. The book reveals the emotional problems doctors face and, unlikely, provides space for them to tell their stories of struggles to become more authentic, and reflective as well as “effective” practitioners. We are presented with insights into what is a deeply gendered world in which many women doctors feel torn between caring at work and for their families, and where men can be absent from “women’s work”, at home and in the surgery; a culture too where racism still pervades attitudes towards “minority” doctors. This is also an environment in which cultural and emotional understandings have tended to be disparaged as “soft” in the name of a harder science. The book provides heroic tales of GPs transcending the shortcomings of training, and the misogyny and racism pervading their profession. Read more…

Telemedicine and Telehealth: Principles, Policies, Performance and Pitfalls

: Darkins, Adam ; Cary, Margaret.

A new millennium now looks set to bring yet another cultural shock. The information age is bringing a new generation of information scientists, together with the hardware and software technologies they generate, into the field of health care. The advantages of these new technologies associated with medicine are countless. Telehealth can bring health care directly to patients, improve the quality of health care, provide equity of access to health care services and reduce the cost of delivering health care. This book brings together the perspectives of a male British-trained specialist physician, Adam Willam Darkins who has worked in the British National Health Service and now works in the United States, and Margaret Ann Cary, a female US family physician who has trained and worked in the United States and United Kingdom. As a result, this book offers a backdrop of private versus nationalised health care systems existing in countries with highly competitive and deregulated telecommunication environments, and looks at a range of models and solutions to make Telehealth work in different health care situations. Read more…

Legal Intimidation

: Donson, Fiona.

SLAPPS (strategic lawsuits against public participation), well known in the United States of America, are on the increase in the United Kingdom. SLAPPS are court actions taken by powerful or wealthy individuals or organizations against ordinary people who seek to express their views and to take part in the decision-making processes which affect their lives. Their effect is meant to “chill” through legal intimidation – to stop the critics and end the debates. A steady growth of SLAPPS has occurred where government and business see their interests being threatened by those who dare to rock the boat. The court case becomes a weapon in a larger political war, tying people up in court rooms, sapping their energy and money, carrying the fear of severe legal sanction. In this way the law is used not to protect a valid legal claim but rather to frighten and silence those who are bold enough to criticize, question and speak out. Looking at various high-profile cases the author, Fiona Donson, considers both the theory and practice of attacks upon free speech in a modern democracy. In the new era of human rights in the United Kingdom the author poses important questions about what the use of such legal actions tells us about the health of our democracy at the turn of the millennium. Read more…

Anti-racist Science Teaching

: Gill, Dawn, Levidow, Lev.

An important contribution by Dawn Gill and Les Levidow to the topical debate on multi-cultural education. The papers extend from general issues about science, nature and race to practical teaching guides and suggested projects, and offer proposals for an anti-racist curriculum. “This book should be essential reading for all science teachers who are concerned to place their role in a wider social context.” New Scientist “This is an extremely informative book which should be read by everyone involved in science education. It shatters the myth that science is objective knowledge by analysing how racism permeates science and science teaching. Read more…