GRID VIEW LIST VIEW

Pillar of Salt: Gender, Memory, and the Perils of Looking Back

: Haaken, Janice.

Recovered memory has become a contentious issue in therapy. For some, recovered memories are accurate images of actual events; for others, recovered memories are fictions termed false memory syndrome. This work moves beyond the poles pf “true: and “false” memories to show how women’s stories reveal layers of gendered and ambiguous meanings, spanning a wide historical, cultural, literary and clinical landscape. Janice Haaken provides an alternative reading of clinical material, showing how sexual storytelling traverses the symbolic and the “real” and how the cultural repression of desire remains as problematic for women as does the psychological legacy of trauma. Read more…

My Shyness, My Self: Learn to Live with Shyness

: Manara, Fausta.

Here, the author, Fausta Manara, explores how persistent and unsuccessful suppression of shyness can generate significant pathologies, such as social phobia, and suggests a constructive approach. The author argues that returning to and examining origins of shyness can aid development. The author urges us to abandon the temptation to seek cures for our shyness but to praise shyness as a determined acceptance of one’s own reality. Read more…

Reaching the Young Autistic Child: Reclaiming Non-autistic Potential Through Communicative Strategies and Games

: Janert, Sibylle

This work aims to help all those involved with autistic children to recover, little by little, from the trauma and despair engendered by the diagnosis autistic, autistic spectrum disorder, autistic features, autistic tendencies or Aspergers syndrome. Sibylle Janert assembles a collection of useful ideas, activities, strategies and games developed by the author from her many years of experience of working with young children with autistic features. Included are descriptions of the many cognitive/behaviourial methods currently available, findings from infant-research and modern psychodynamic understanding, which are based on the underlying assumption that in any human being, including the most severely autistic child, there will be by definition by some healthy developmental i.e. non autistic, potential towards human contact and communication. Read more…

Sad Dad: An Exploration of Postnatal Depression in Fathers

: Olivia Spencer

Can fathers really get postnatal depression? What does this mean for their children and partners? How can we tell if a father is depressed? What can be done about it? Why has it gone undetected and under-acknowledged for so long? In a ground breaking project, the author explores recent research and  begins by asking whether the phenomenon is real. After interviewing a number of prominent experts she reaches a conclusion which will surprise many and could cause a shift in perceptions about childbirth. The author uses first hand accounts from fathers as well as contributions from experts like world-renowned obstetrician Michel Odent, writer and academic Andrew Solomon, psychotherapist Adam Jukes, paediatrician Aldo Naouri, and Jeszemma Garratt of the Fatherhood Institute who shed unique light on this potentially controversial but hitherto virtually unrecognised problem. Olivia Spencer is a writer and researcher living in London with her children and their father. Read more…