GRID VIEW LIST VIEW

Dads Don’t Babysit: Towards Equal Parenting

  By turns informative and irreverent this book takes a new approach to tackling gender inequality in the home and at work, focusing on dads being entitled to a bigger role in parenting. It presents the barriers men face to being active dads – from sexist security guards to Tory MPs and even Homer Simpson –  and, crucially, it outlines how to tackle them for the good of men, women and children.   In Dads Don’t Babysit two dads outline some of the biggest problems facing families that want dad to get his turn at raising the kids, and offer a range of solutions in a manifesto for parents and policy makers to consider and hopefully adopt. The book tackles topics such as the gender pay gap, lack of a strong parental leave system in the UK, the financial penalties of taking time off to look after children and the limiting expectations parents find colleagues, relatives and the media have on mums and dads.   The authors draw on their own experience of parenting and that of others.  Interviews are backed up by extensive research so that the book presents these important issues in an accessible, personal and at times light-hearted way that the apolitical reader will be able to relate to.  There is a lively and growing argument about men’s role in the 21st century and this book offers a unique perspective, giving a feminist argument by men offering solutions to benefit everyone.     David Freed is a successful blogger and his website on shared parenting receives thousands of hits per week.  He works part-time as a civil servant, a job he returned to after taking six months parental leave.   James Millar has worked as a journalist for twenty years.  He co-authored The Gender Agenda  (published in 2017) which was based on a popular twitter account @GenderDiary. Read more…

Contemporary Perspectives in Psychotherapy and Homosexualities

: Shelley, Christopher

Most psychotherapy training programmes don’t incorporate elements which examine the special needs of the gay and lesbian populations. It is therefore questionable whether practitioners possess the basic necessary skills for assessing and employing interventions based on sexually sensitive material. An unexamined and untrained approach to working with homosexual populations can no longer be tolerated. This book edited by Christopher Shelley addresses some of the incoherence that exists in this field. The contributors propose theories and models of practice that will be more beneficial to the therapeutic needs of homosexual clients. Their accounts represent a significant step towards a better understanding of the needs of this client group. Read more…

Fetish: An Erotics of Culture

: Krips, Henry.

Drawing on Jacques Lacan’s theory of gaze and Louis Althusser’s concept of ideology, this work explores the means by which texts create pleasure and desire. The analyses are developed in the context of a discussion of a wide range of texts drawn from anthropology, literature, art and physics. Building on Homi Bhabha’s reading of slave literatures and on screen theory’s concept of the cinematic image, Henry Krips offers alternative accounts of fetishism and gaze, which provide radically different perspectives on the complex relations among text, pleasure and desire. Read more…

The Dividing of Women, or Women’s Lot

: Lemoine-Luccioni, Eugenie

Eugenie Lemoine-Luccioni, M. Davenport (Translator), M. Read more…

The Many Faces of Eros: Psychoanalytic Exploration of Human Sexuality

: McDougall, Joyce.

‘Human sexuality is inherently traumatic.’ Thus begins this fascinating study by one of the world’s most distinguished writers in this field. Joyce McDougall convincingly demonstrates that the psychic conflicts arising from the tensions between the inner world of primitive instinctual drives and the constraining and denying forces of the external world begin in earliest infancy and have ramifications throughout life. Read more…

Women without a Shadow

: Tubert, Silvia.

The rapid development of reproductive technologies has questioned many essential concepts belonging to our symbolic universe, such as human reproduction, motherhood and fatherhood; the transmission of the biological and cultural inheritance of mankind and the constitution of the psychic subject. These concepts, however, are supported by ideologies and value systems which hide that they are but theoretical constructions; consequently, they are taken as describing the “natural” function of reproduction. In this sense, the technological development takes the form of an increasing medicalization of the human body, of the life, sexuality and desire of people, especially of women. All this requires that we think critically about the conditions of possibility of these technologies and their psychological and ethical implications. In this book the author provides a detailed and rigorous analysis which locates the reproductive technologies in the historical context of the progressive technification of the management of human life, and their relation to the social and medical discourses on femininity, maternity and infertility. From a psychoanalytic point of view, culture and its discontents, violence, domination, are related intimately to the problematic character of sexuality, which includes the uncertainties of our desires. Social, medical, anthropological and literary discourses try to define “maternal desire” in order to control it: the definitions which capture it in their nets are means to dominate desire as an object and to “construct” the desiring subject. But psychoanalysis (through the associations of the subjects in question) shows that we face here an impossible question: one thing is the enunciated “demand”, what is said about one’s own desire (“I want a child”), and a very different one is the unconscious desire which disturbs the conscious discourse and shows that there can be psychological obstacles that interfere with the accomplishment of conscious wishes, conflicts and contradictions emerging through the women’s words. In this book by Silvia Tubert, the circulation of representations between the individual imaginary and collective myths is the basis of a multidisciplinary complex and original point of view, which confronts a variety of discourses arising from psychoanalysis, medicine, journalism, ethnology, mythology and literature. Read more…

Sacred Cycles: The Spiral of Women’s Well Being

: Wickham, Sara.

Have you ever thought about how you would like to be born, wondered why tampon adverts always use blue liquid or dreamed of living in a society with Government-funded luxury hotels for women who needed space? Have you ever wondered why so many women living in the West still believe their bodies are inferior to men’s and that others hold responsibility for their health and well being? By comparing the things we have been taught about our bodies, to real women’s experiences, women-centred research and common sense wisdom, Sara Wickham’s book explores women’s reproductive health and well being through the eyes of women themselves, examining myths and opinions and questioning whether the things we learn from the media and through education systems are serving us well. The author explores a wide variety of historical and cultural perspectives, and, drawing on the experiences of over 100 women, the major transitions of women’s lives are explored. Does science have all the answers, or is there a space for other ways of knowing? Are medical recommendations more accurate than old wives’ tales? How do women care for themselves during their menstrual cycles, or during menopause, and would it be better to turn our ideas of health and healing upside down? This book will enable women to realise that they are the experts in their own lives and health, and enable men to deepen their understanding of who we are. Read more…

Is There a Cure for Masculinity?

: Jukes, Adam.

Have you ever wondered? * Why it’s so hard to get close to a man. * Why don’t men express emotions except big ones like anger and frustration? * Why most perversion is male; why most pornography is produced by men for men? Risk taking is male; drinking, drug taking, gambling and infidelity are predominantly the preserve of men? * Why most criminal behavior is perpetrated by men? Why thevast majority of domestic abuse and violence is perpetrated by men? * Why men are so concerned with the size of their penis and its symbolic substitutes – big, powerful cars, status, big houses, big money, and big muscles? * Why can’t men tolerate vulnerability? * Why men lie, don’t listen, don’t do housework, parenting? The answers to these questions, is the aim of this book. The author asks what it means to be a man, and what part masculinity play in men’s identity. What is it like to have to spend so much time and energy in managing that identity? Adam Jukes has spent most of his professional life working with troubled and disturbed men, and in 1984 he opened one of the world’s first treatment centers to address men’s abusive and violent behavior towards women, from verbal and emotional abuse through to stalking and murder. In the following decades that work developed into a clinical examination of masculinity and the author now shares his insights and conclusions with the reader. Adam Juke’s conclusions about what constructs masculinity and how it develops may be unpalatable to some but it is also thought provoking and intriguing to anyone who has an interest in these issues whether professional or personal, male or female, wife or lover, sister or brother, husband or father. Read more…

Gender Space and Power

: Vianello, Mino Caramazza, Elena .

Presenting the key concept of ‘ovular space’ as opposed to ‘rectilinear’ spatial concepts as a new paradigm for social analysis, the authors put forward a wide-ranging social and cultural critique based on a utopian vision of a new social organization. They argue for a reversal of the ‘masculinism’ that has predominated throughout human history to date. They analyse the origins and structures of this predominant cultural form and describe phenomena that indicate that this pattern is shifting with changes in gender roles. They emphasize that their approach is not biologistic or essentialist and that their argument is based on the psychosocial reaction to biological fact. Their argument is based on a fundamental opposition between ‘formal-rational thinking, prototypical of the male mind’ and ‘female, ovular thinking, expressing itself in empathy’, which they regard as a key component of social change in contemporary society. The book is divided into two parts, the first of which is entitled ‘Space representation and the construction of social reality’. This part addresses (1) ‘Mind and space’, (2) ‘Gender difference in space representation’, (3) ‘Prestige and violence’, (4) ‘Religion, destructiveness, territory’, (5) ‘Thought and sex’, (6) ‘Public power as male structure’, (7) ‘Geometry and the law’, (8) ‘Ovular space-representation, women and family’, (9) ‘The family as political cell: for a re-establishment of public life’ and (10) ‘Gender equality: a prerequisite for the defeat of capitalism: towards forms of associate federalism’. Part 2, entitled ‘Towards a new viewpoint’, addresses the implications of this new perspective for various fields of thought: political science, psychology, sociology, historiography, economics, demography and social ethics. These chapters discuss the problems relating to ‘masculinist’ bias in these subject areas and indicate some possible new approaches. In their vision of a new society, there is brief reference to the ‘kibbutz’ model of a different social structure but the main focus is on how devolved ‘family networks’ would lead to new forms of government. Read more…

Witches: A Psychoanalytic Exploration of the Killing of Women

: Heinemann, Evelyn.

In this topical study the author argues that the naming and persecution of women as witches in the 16th and 17th century resulted from the powerful unresolved psychic conflicts of their persecutors. The historical and social contexts in which trials took place are examined for evidence of how attitudes and beliefs of the time came to play their part in the extraordinary development of this persecutory phenomenon. Evelyn Heinemann asserts that the witch phenomenon is an example of the potential for destructiveness by the human imagination and shows the necessity of understanding unconscious processes in social phenomena today. The dark forces and process identifiable in the past continue to find expression in the demonization and persecution of men and women today. This book will be of interest to psychoanalysts, sociologists, social historians and women everywhere. Read more…