GRID VIEW LIST VIEW

Techno-sexual Landscapes

: Cleminson, Richard; Gordo-Lopez, Angel.

At first sight, to ask how sex has been influenced by technology over time may appear to be a perplexing question. There is no doubt about the current importance of the new technologies of reproduction, sex-change operations, and the passion that electronic chat-rooms incite. However, it might be argued, this is surely a recent phenomenon and the past has little to reveal about “techno-sexual” relations. Richard Cleminson and Angel Gordo-Lopez’s book draws on a number of examples of “productive” relations between technology and sexuality: the technical and sexual organisation of medieval monasteries, the moral and erotic transgression afforded by the early wind and water mill, and the romances forged in the context of the train. The authors focus on three main eras: the medieval period (around the 11th century with its monasteries as sites of technical innovation and heretical religious movements on the borders of Christianity); early modernity (from the time of the European “discoveries” and the creation of “others” including the natives of South America and the witch); and the present and the technologically-mediated future. What might be the connection between mills, navigation techniques and trains and the realm of sexuality? How does the government of sexuality and socio-economic relations in the 16th century across distances find resonance in cyberspace? Once the question of technology and sexuality has been placed in a long-term perspective, the reader is invited to reconsider relations often brushed aside, or devalued for their connection with “low”, popular or quotidian culture, practices and spaces. Acknowledging the uncomfortable social fact of “techno-sexuality” as a quotidian experience allows us to recuperate a range of often discounted or forgotten social actors, movements and landscapes. Read more…

The Body as Mirror of the World

: Chasseguet-Smirgel, J.

Is today’s thinking conditioned by body-mind dualism? A rebellion against the biological order seems to have silently infiltrated our world view. Suicide bombers appear to share the fascination with destruction, of writers such as Mishima, Pasolini and Foucault. A liberation from the body to re-establish a – possibly mystical – union of soul and cosmos and an assertion of the mind’s omnipotence appear to be common features of forms of behaviour that seem to be taken for granted in contemporary thought. Is the new misogyny, which rejects motherhood in the name of feminism, contributing in any way to these trends? This review of our society by a woman psychoanalyst – a non-medic and graduate of the Institut d’Etudes Politiques in Paris – presents a sharp and rigorous analysis of the strange and violent mechanisms that are erupting in the world today. Read more…

Playing the Love Market: Dating, Romance and the Real World

: Cameron, Samuel; Collins, Alan

This book directly addresses the question of what is causing people, regardless of their sexuality to use more commercial means of searching for potential partners. The authors, Samuel Cameron and Alan Collins do this in a straightforward, realistic but generally neglected view by psychologists, sociologists, and other personal relationship professionals. They investigate the effectiveness and personal cost of searching for partners by different methods; how people trade off age, physical attractiveness and financial resources against each other; the risks of different dating methods; and the differences in the market for same-sex dating partners. While existing studies and guides to the dating process typically bypass the simple, inescapable and essential features of the way human beings proceed to instigate and assess relationships, the bottom line is that there is a market for potential relationship partners, in which individuals have to function to acquire dates. Like any market there is a supply and demand for the ‘good’ in question. This book shows how simple economic reasoning can explain many of the characteristics of the market for dating partners, and also suggest strategies for effective participation in this market. Read more…

AIDS, Africa and Racism

: Chirimuuta, Rosalind; Chirimuuta

This book demonstrates the racist preconceptions that have guided the collection of evidence on AIDS in Africa and is a response to the alleged African origins of AIDS. The authors, Richard  & Rosalind Chirimuuta have added a substantial postscript for this edition. In it they point out that even though several Western researchers have withdrawn some of their evidence and specific claims, they still attempt to substantiate racist hypotheses. Read more…

The Politics of Attachment: Towards a Secure Society

: Kraemer, Sebastian; Roberts, Jane

Growing insecurity and uncertainty seem to characterise the human condition at the end of the twentieth century. The contributors to The Politics of Attachment, edited by Sebastian Kraemer and  Jane Roberts – are all distinguished authorities from a variety of backgrounds in public, professional and academic life – sharing a common conviction that we all have a powerful need to belong, to be attached to people, places and projects, and that social and political processes must reflect that. The writers draw on recent research and debate in developmental psychology and political science to provide a unique dialogue between the psychological and the social – a political grasp of ordinary human needs. Read more…

Cyborg Worlds: The Military Information Society

: Levidow, Lev

Lev Levidow has been Managing Editor of Science as Culture since its inception in 1987, and of its predecessor, the Radical Science Journal. He is Research Fellow at the Open University. He has been involved in the Palestine Solidarity Campaign. Collection of 7 essays + Introduction on military technology, cyborg soldiers, infotech, the post-Fordist interface between man & machine, automated war, & much more. Read more…

Collaborative creativity: Contemporary perspectives

: Miell, Dorothy

The contributors to this volume adopt a socio-cultural approach to understanding collaborative creativity across a wide range of domains such as music composition, business, school-based creative writing and art, fashion design, theatre production and web-based academic collaborations. Central to the socio-cultural approach to creativity is the recognition that it is a fundamentally social process. It thus follows that, if we are to understand and characterise human creativity, we need to examine the cultural, institutional and interpersonal contexts that support and sustain such activity. We also need to understand how cultural tools and technologies resource collaborative creativity. The volume offers a distinctive and valuable contribution to this growing field of scholarship by presenting new empirical findings, reviews and critiques of existing literature together with suggestions for how this field should develop. Edited by Dorothy Miell and Karen Littleton. Read more…

Sentience: Companion to Reason

: Singer, Ming

Ming Singer’s work is about bridging the current deeply-held divide between sentience and reason. It focuses on the pragmatic role of sentient experience and its unceasing and inseparable interplay with the exercise of reason. Part I of the book deals first with the need for synthesizing the hitherto separate “truth-finding” knowledge traditions: the third-personal scientific-technological, and the first-personal humanistic-wisdom tradition. A conceptual framework for a mind reality is then proposed. Drawing from the unifying natural laws in current physical and biological sciences, the mind reality is portrayed in terms of one interlocking open dynamic system with both a manifested and a covert aspect. In this entire system, each individual mind constantly “co-creates” and “co-evolves” with other collective or group minds at various levels. It is also presumed that the basic unit of interaction in the mind reality is thought or intent. Supporting evidence from psychology, parapsychology and the ancient perennial philosophies is presented. The second part of the book addresses the pragmatic consequences of the proposed mind reality. At the individual level, it is argued that sentient experience can serve the function of guiding, affirming and fostering an individual’s life’s work. A selection of existing first-personal accounts is presented to illustrate this point. At the collective level, the current dominant collective thought of “new capitalism” has the unfortunate consequences for humanity’s sense of freedom, education and morality. Such consequences pertain to the “exteriorization” and the “deconstruction” of the intrinsic self and intrinsic values. To avoid this to happen, a collective effort at changing consciousness becomes necessary: the core task lies with the closure of the reason and sentience divide. Read more…

Before Words

: Benedetto, Antonio

Psychoanalysis has continuously been applied to the exploration of creativity and artistic genius, but up to now, this has not produced its own systematic body of knowledge. The traditional psychoanalytic approach to art is to attempt to decode it, in order to capture its hidden meaning. But in this book, the author explains that it is through the arts, we discover important aspects of ourselves. Antonio Di Benedetto argues for a completely new approach.. By employing analytic receptivity to listen to the aesthetic object and what it has to say, art becomes the interpretative key instead. Furthermore, the author shows how the arts can inspire psychoanalysis, helping it to recover its intuitive and poetic roots and providing forms, images and sounds to best represent fleeting introspective moments and pre-verbal insight. To illustrate these pre-symbolic aspects of introspection, the author examines well-known aesthetic masterpieces; the frescoes of the Loggia of Psyche in Rome, Mozart’s The Magic Flute, and Six Characters in Search of an Author, by L. Pirandello. Of these, Antonio Di Benedetto considers music to be the artistic form best suited to refine the analyst’s capacity to listen to the affective component of unconscious communication. Read more…

Why Men Hate Women

: Jukes, Adam

What makes a man like John, in every respect a cultured and charming man, successful in his career and liked by his friends and acquaintances, behave violently towards a woman he says he loves? Is he sick? Is he different from other men? Is it, as he says, Jane’s fault? Does she like being beaten? Otherwise why would she go on doing what she knows upsets him? Adam Jukes hopes that by the end of his demanding but gripping book, the reader will be able to answer these questions. Adam Jukes works with men who are abusive and violent to women. In the last five years he has been involved in the London Men’s Centre, which offers dedicated programmes to men who are violent. He began working with abusive men as a psychodynamic psychotherapist, but as his work continued he found that the work of feminists in the refuge movement and in the ‘speaking bitterness’ literature could not be ignored. He integrates these two perspectives in his work. The way in which he presents men in this book will generate distress for those men who experience their masculinity as a burden – for he argues that misogyny, the hatred of women, is an inescapable element in the development of masculinity. But he also shows how the model of misogyny which informs the book is applied to an intervention programme to stop male abusiveness. This is a shocking book. Its thought-provoking view of the issues will be of great interest to mental health professionals and all concerned readers. Read more…