GRID VIEW LIST VIEW

Vision and Separation

: Wright, Kenneth

Dr Kenneth Wright presents an original reading of Freud, Winnicott and Bowlby, which takes the gaze between mother and baby as a metaphor for the entire developmental process. He argues further that psychoanalytic theories of development have neglected the importance of the face in early experience. Winner of The Margaret S Mahler 1992 Prize for Literature. Read more…

Children, Feelings and Divorce

: Smith, Heather

The outcome of the author’s twenty-five years of working with children whose parents have divorced, Children, Feelings and Divorce contains a unique feature chapter where the author, Heather Smith, addresses children and their concerns about their divorcing parents. This book has a positive approach and should be essential reading for anyone with children who are facing a divorce. Read more…

The Lone Twin

: Woodward, Joan

‘There is no doubt a greater awareness now of the significance of twin loss than there was ten years ago. I think that this is largely due to a big increase in articles, radio and television programmes as well as the spread of the Network. The well-known researcher Nancy Segal in the USA has, through her many books, added knowledge to our understanding of twin relationships as well as twin loss. She believes the loss to be highly significant and queries whether for some lone twins it is greater even than that of the loss of a spouse (Segal 2000). Others have written autobiographical material about their loss (Jones 1987; Farmer 1988). In spite of this, there is still ignorance. At a recent book launch for the publication of a book about the loss of a twin through drug taking (Burton-Phillips 2007) someone in the field of education said to a few of us from the Network, that she did not see how a twin who lost their twin at birth could possibly be affected. She asked, ‘How would the surviving twin know?’ I asked her to imagine how she might feel if told during her childhood that she had been born a twin, but due to her taking all the food’ during the pregnancy, her twin had not survived. I suggested that perhaps worse, she might have had her parents make it clear that they wished her twin had been the one to live. Less dramatically, she was asked how she might feel missing someone all her life who ‘should have been there’ to share it. This question was put by a lone twin who added that she had also had surviving twins born to the family to watch growing up as a pair, while she was without her twin sister. The educationist was honest and said she had never thought of those things before and then freely admitted our comments made her think again’ – Joan Woodward, Author. Read more…

Recovering from Childhood Wounds

: Lecompte, Jacques

How do we recover from childhood? How do we survive affliction, misfortune, and for some of us, physical violence and psychological mistreatment? Understanding ‘natural resilience’ can help us to assist those who have suffered: mistreated children, drifting adolescents and those affected by traumas, natural catastrophes or serious illnesses. The first studies of resilience date back to the Second World War and initially focused upon understanding the astonishing resilience of children faced with life-endangering situations in wartime. Although conceived initially at an individual level, resilience can also be studied at group and ethnic levels and applied to a multitude of situations of a potentially or obviously stressful character. In this moving and illuminating book, Jacques Lecompte offers a message of hope and initiates a process of reflection on how contemporary society fosters resilience amongst the vulnerable. Read more…

Pervasive Perversion

: Lee, Jason

During the 1980s discourse concerning child sexual abuse became central to the US/UK media, and in the 1990,s popular culture frequently took child sexual abuse as a subject for representation. Numerous claims of child sexual abuse were made between 1984 and 1994, not all of which were real. Everyday news throughout the 1990s highlighted concerns concerning abduction by paedophiles and children being at risk from predatory paedophiles using the Internet. While the media continually made child sexual abuse a central concern of public debate, popular culture, particularly films, explored this issue in fiction and docudrama. Many of these films reproduced some of the central myths concerning child sexual abuse and paedophilia. Men abusing children, women abusing children, children abusing other children, became staple fodder in mainstream feature films. In 2005 ‘the most famous person in the world’ was again on trial for what is popularly considered to be the most heinous of crimes. Pervasive Perversions analyses a range of media and popular culture texts concerned with child sexual abuse. With sections on new media, fiction film, and celebrity culture, key questions are examined. Why did mass hysteria break out in the 1980s over sexual abuse and continue throughout the final decades of the twentieth century? What was the significance of this phenomenon? How have the constructions and representation of child sexual abuse in the media and popular culture altered? What do these images and narratives convey concerning the understanding of child sexual abuse in the public consciousness? How does this relate to the reality? What is the relationship between celebrity culture and child sexual abuse? Jason Lee examines these questions through an extensive evaluation of all forms of media and popular culture and comprehensively unearths and demystifies the key myths of child sexual abuse in contemporary media and popular culture. Read more…

Breastfeeding Older Children

: Sinnott, Ann

Breastfeeding is a globally recognized imperative for the preservation of infant health, and governments around the world have introduced breastfeeding promotion measures. While initiation rates have improved, duration rates at a few weeks or months after birth still lag behind the World Health Organization’s recommendation that breastfeeding – for all children, in both developed and developing worlds – should continue for at least two years. Behind the figures, there is however an inverse reality. Today, increasing numbers of women in the industrialized world challenge social convention and breastfeed their children well beyond WHO guidelines. How widespread is this surprising, many would say shocking, phenomenon? Is it Nature’s way or an unhealthy practice? Do mothers prolong breastfeeding for their own pleasure? Is it, as some say, a form of sexual abuse? Do overly controlling women coerce children into continuing because they wish their children to remain dependent, or are they meeting an innate child need? Does long-term breastfeeding impact negatively on child physical and emotional health, or does it have a positive effect? Do mothers pay a price? How does the practice affect the family, and the couple relationship? Are breasts intended for infant feeding or for sexual pleasure? How and when did early weaning become established practice in the western world? Is sustained breastfeeding a reversion to a pre-feminist state, or is it a truly feminist issue? Drawing on child development theories and neuroscience research, archaeological findings and anthropological opinion, this book, explores the myths and reality surrounding this taboo practice to answer these and many other questions. In extracts from questionnaires, we also hear directly from mothers, fathers and the children themselves. Thought-provoking and challenging, Ann Sinnott’s well-researched but thoroughly accessible book will appeal to all concerned with infant feeding and child health, as well as those with an interest in prehistory and the origins of western culture. Read more…

Critical Voices in Child and Adolescent Mental Health

: Maitra, Begum Timimi, Sami

“Part of these institutionalized biases, we think, results from the institutionalized racism that lies at the heart of the conceptual systems we use in psychiatry”. There is a crisis of credibility within child and adolescent psychiatry. Child and adolescent mental health theory and practice have come to be dominated by a narrow biomedical frame. Rising numbers of children are being diagnosed with psychiatric illnesses and given psychotropic medication to ‘treat’ these ‘illnesses’. This text brings together knowledgeable specialists across the spectrum of child and adolescent psychiatry, which are deeply critical about current mainstream theory and practice. These ‘critical voices’ drawing upon research and writing from related disciplines, radically question many of psychiatry’s most cherished assumptions and offer new ways of thinking about theory and practice. This courageous book by authors Begum Maitra and  Samiaims Timimi  brings marginal voices into the mainstream. Exploring the influence of drug companies, the impact of trauma, the crisis in academic medicine, systemic perspectives, adolescent in-patient units, ADHD, childhood depression and the role of diet and nutrition, the contributors offer hope to those looking for alternatives to diagnosis and medication for children and families with emotional and behavioral problems. Read more…

Talking with Mothers

: Breen, Dana

Dana Breen’s book is about being a mother – a mother with a baby inside her and then outside her. It is about fears, fantasies and expectations. Centring on almost weekly conversations with one woman, ‘Barbara’, and her feelings over the months of pregnancy, the book conveys the continuity in the inner world of a woman during the experience of carrying, bringing into existence, nurturing and weaning a baby. The reader is thus able to share the suspense inherent in every pregnancy and in every woman’s mind as she approaches labour and her first meeting with her baby. Read more…

The Farmer and the Obstetrician

: Odent, Michel

Michel Odent’s title seeks to show how farming and childbirth have been industrialized side by side during the 20th century with dramatic and disturbing consequences. In both cases innovations have been presented as the long awaited solution to an old problem. The advent of synthetic pesticides has increased agricultural productivity, similarly the advent of the safe caesarean section has offerd new reasons to create gigantic obstetrical departments. In both spheres sceptics voiced fears concerning the negative long term consequences of the use of novel, little tested practices. The industrialization of farming has sparked a series of disasters, industrialized childbirth has not, yet, reached the same phase of its history. Read more…