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  • Think You Don’t Want What You’ve Got? Wrong!

    Think You Don’t Want What You’ve Got? Wrong!

    Adam Jukes’ New Book Expands on ‘The Mad Hypothesis’ If you’re having a hard time in any aspect of your life (relationship, career, family), the last thing you want to hear is that your bad situation is exactly the situation you want to be in. But that’s just what Adam Jukes is telling us in his latest book. It’s worth hearing him out, though! Our unconscious desires may be driving our behaviours and keeping us in dead-end jobs or unhappy relationships, but with some real thought and attention, we can see those desires for what they are. If we work with Jukes’ ‘Mad Hypothesis’, we can start to really change our behaviours and build better relationships and more satisfying lives. The ‘Mad Hypothesis’ – so called because it might seem ‘mad’ at first glance – states: ‘You are responsible for everything that is wrong with your relationship including any behavior of your partner which you use to justify, excuse, or in any other way account for your own behavior towards him/her, or the world in general.’ This idea, which Jukes first introduced in his work with abusive men and later developed and expanded to include in his work with all his patients including women, is central to his therapeutic approach. In the book, he provides several examples of how the hypothesis is borne out in various patients, and once you see its validity, you can see how it applies to your own life. Jukes applies this theory to issues such as anxiety, sulking, masochism, and attachment. The book includes case studies that show why his theories and practices work. Therapists can use this book as a tool when working with patients, and non-professionals can use it as a guide in their own lives as they strive to truly understand themselves. Exploring your unconscious desires is difficult work, but if you do this, you can begin to use different behaviours and achieve different results—the results you want. Read more…

  • New Mothers Experiencing PND: Are You Fine (Not Fine)?

    New Mothers Experiencing PND: Are You Fine (Not Fine)?

    ‘Most mothers, indeed parents, describe the experience of having a child as magical. In fact, in the days after my first baby was born, a friend told me, “It’s a magical time, those first few days”. I remember repeating this to my husband wryly: we shook our heads and braced ourselves for another day.’ Perinatal depression (PND) is a serious condition that affects about one in ten new mothers (and fathers). In recent years, it has finally started to receive attention from medical professionals and the general public; what was once taboo to talk about is now discussed by movie stars and major newspapers, and new parents are looking for resources to help guide them through a difficult time. After the success of Olivia Spencer’s Sad Dad, a book on PND in fathers, FAB is proud to launch another title on the topic of PND: Bridget Hargreave’s Fine (Not Fine). Like many expectant mothers, Bridget was excited to welcome her first child into the world. But once the (actually fairly traumatic) birth experience was over, she found it difficult to connect to her son and she was soon drowning in a feeling that everything was too much. The mundane but endless tasks of caring for a baby—feed, change nappy, put down for a nap, repeat—overwhelmed her. Recognising that this wasn’t the ‘normal’ new mother feeling, Bridget reached out quite early for help. Her doctor prescribed anti-depressants, which quickly took effect and helped Bridget feel able to cope with the demands of motherhood, and to really connect with her son and enjoy this new phase of her life. Despite her attempts to head it off when she had her second child, Bridget experienced PND a second time as well. Bridget has put together a terrific resource for other new parents wondering what’s happening to them and what to do about it. She talked to new mothers experiencing PND, as well as health care professionals and charity workers who support those suffering from PND. Fine (Not Fine) covers a broad spectrum of experiences. It also looks at how different health care organisations respond to mothers who suffer from PND, and at the charities that are working hard to provide support for sufferers. Read more…

  • Enter The Studio and Step Into Gill Gregory’s Fascinating Memoir

    Enter The Studio and Step Into Gill Gregory’s Fascinating Memoir

    This year sees the publication of perhaps FAB’s most unique title: a memoir seen through a kaleidoscope of psychoanalysis, art appreciation, and family history. In The Studio, Gill Gregory, lecturer in literature and award-winning author, takes us through her Dulwich studio as a way of taking us through her life. Each chapter centres around a painting particularly meaningful to Gregory, and she uses it to reflect on her past—especially on her relationship with her father, a pioneering psychoanalyst, and with her brother, whose severe epilepsy affected her deeply from a young age. Sometimes the subject matter reminds her of something in her life, and sometimes it’s the story of the painting itself that draws her to it. Rigorously investigating her past doesn’t yield only psychological revelations and meaningful emotional connections, but also more tangible treasures, like the fact that a relative on her mother’s side made The Stoop Bequest in 1933—the first important modern art collection held by the Tate. It’s moments like these that make it clear Gregory was wise to use the paintings from her Dulwich home as a throughline for this work, since art is a throughline in her life. Gregory writes without psychological jargon but with a solid understanding of how psychoanalysis works, and she writes intelligently about art and literature as well, all of which makes The Studio enjoyable for experts and laypeople alike. Check out our most unique title yet, and enter Gill Gregory’s studio—enjoy the tour.   “Gill Gregory’s poetic memoir maps the struggle to be free from a paralysing past by way of an exploration of paintings and psychoanalysis. The Studio breaks the mould of autobiographical writing like Marion Milner’s On Not Being Able To Paint, and tells a story that is at once lyrical and scholarly, emotionally gripping and historically intriguing—moving above all. This is an outstandingly gifted and rare book. Read more…

  • Through the Night by Dilys Daws

    Through the Night by Dilys Daws

    Any new parent can tell you that the hardest thing to get used to with baby is the lack of sleep. After the baby is about six months old, she doesn’t need nighttime feedings anymore, but that doesn’t mean she isn’t awake and screaming for mum and dad at all hours. Exhausted parents often turn to sleep training programmes, in an attempt to train their child to sleep at intervals that work for them. But what if we’re looking at it all wrong? What if babies don’t sleep through the night because of family dynamics and their own internal lives? Infant and child psychotherapist Dilys Daws invites parents to consider these questions as they look at their babies’ sleep patterns. Losses or separations in parents’ own lives can make it hard to help a baby feel secure enough to go to sleep.  Difficult births can prevent a mother and baby get into a rhythm with each other.  The normal stress of becoming parents can lead to tension between them.  All of this can affect a baby’s sleep.  This not about parent-blaming—but seeing the origins of problems can strengthen the ability to solve them. By considering the baby as a person with his own psychological concerns that parents can address, we can approach the question from a new perspective. A classic since its original publication in 1989, Daws’ Through the Night is a must for parents who want the whole family get a good night’s sleep, and for mental health professionals who want to help make that happen. Read more…

  • What is Daseinsanalysis, and How Can it Help?

    What is Daseinsanalysis, and How Can it Help?

    What if people suffering mental anguish are suffering from a crippling awareness of how delicate life is and how alone we are in living it? What if the main problem behind many therapy patients’ problems was an existential one? Daseinsanalysis is the psychotherapeutic approach that takes this view as its starting point; it is a therapy wedded to an existential philosophy. Dr. Alice Holzhey-Kunz’s new book,Daseinsanalysis, explains the theories involved in this psychiatric practice, and how it can help people suffering mental anguish at simply being in the world. Ludwig Binswanger and Medard Boss developed daseinsanalysis based on the philosophies of Kierkegaard, Heidegger and Sartre, but also the psychoanalytic approach of Freud, to arrive at a specific mode of addressing this type of mental suffering. Holzhey-Kunz delves into the development of this theory, as well as important differences in thought between Binswanger and Boss. A leading expert in the field, Holzhey-Kunz makes the case for a daseinsanalytic approach to psychotherapy in the modern age.   Daseinsanalysis by Alice Holzhey-Kunz is available to purchase via Amazon   By Lisa Findley www.lisafindley. Read more…

  • Is There a Cure for Masculinity? Serves as Diagnosis and Treatment, All in One Book

    Is There a Cure for Masculinity? Serves as Diagnosis and Treatment, All in One Book

      As the world reels from the verdict of the Oscar Pistorius trial and the videotape of American footballer Ray Rice beating his fiancée, the pervasiveness of domestic violence once again becomes clear. Why do men harm their partners? What is it about masculinity that makes men the perpetrators in the majority of domestic abuse cases? What are men learning about what it means to be a man in modern society, and why does that so often lead to violence, repressed feelings, an obsession with status symbols and power? Adam Jukes has made a long-term study of masculinity, and in his book, Is There a Cure for Masculinity?, he shares the results of years of research. As the title of the book implies, Jukes sees masculinity as an illness, and it’s one that boys contract early in their childhood. When boys are encouraged to ‘man up’, or to stop acting ‘girly’, they’re being taught the divide between the masculine and the feminine. Men learn from an early age that their feminine side must always be repressed, and this results in a lack of intimacy with their partners and their own children, and an inability to express themselves. They feel vulnerable, a state which they have learned to despise, and because masculinity only allows men a limited scope of emotions, they react with risky and often violent, destructive behaviour. Masculinity makes men sick, and symptoms of that sickness include workaholism, heavy drinking, infidelity, and the kind of vicious violence seen most recently in the cases of Pistorius and Rice. Yet Jukes says there is hope. Men can get involved in talk therapy, and it is vitally important that we raise our boys to be open to vulnerability. If men start spending more time with their families and raise their boys to be kind, we just might be able to answer the question with a resounding yes—there is a cure for masculinity.  Is There a Cure for Masculinity? is now available at a special discount of 35% plus free UK P&P from direct from NBN International – CLICK HERE to purchase at this special price, and use the promotion code JUKES001 .  Also available from Amazon. by Lisa Findley  www.lisafindley. Read more…

  • Sad Dad is a New, Vital Voice in the Area of Postnatal Depression in Fathers

    Sad Dad is a New, Vital Voice in the Area of Postnatal Depression in Fathers

    Having a child is one of the great joys in life, but for some, once baby is home, depression sets in. Postnatal depression is a well-known illness among new mothers, but recent research shows it’s also a serious problem for many new fathers. Olivia Spencer’s groundbreaking book, Sad Dad, explores the various causes and symptoms of postnatal depression in fathers, and what can be done about it. Symptoms such as irritability, sleeplessness and loss of appetite can affect both men and women, but men may experience additional symptoms such as heavy drinking or working late hours. If we can see how these are often symptoms of a serious depressive problem, rather than bad dad behaviour, we can do a better job of helping the men who suffer from it. Sad Dad combines personal anecdote with scientific research in an engaging way. We hear from men and women about how fathers suffering from postnatal depression affect their partners and their children. We’re reminded that because people are unique, we need a comprehensive approach to preventing and treating postnatal depression in men. This includes considering possibly controversial theories, such as that of renowned obstetrician Michel Odent, who suggests that being present for childbirth might actually trigger this depression—and sometimes physical ill health—in men. Spencer talks with several additional experts in her drive to better understand the relatively unknown phenomenon of postnatal depression in men, including Jeszemma Garratt of the Fatherhood Institute, academic Andrew Solomon, and paediatrician Aldo Naouri. Psychotherapist Adam Jukes emphasizes the need for better resources for men to cope with welcoming a new baby into their lives. Sad Dad is a new resource for men and women encountering postnatal depression in their lives, researchers looking for some of the major issues and arguments contained in one book and anyone interested in learning more about this crucial health issue. Olivia Spencer has written about postnatal depression in fathers for The Huffington Post. Free Association Books is proud to announce that Sad Dads is out now, available for purchase at your local bookstore and on Amazon. By Lisa Findley www.lisafindley. Read more…

  • Titles Back in Print for 2014

    Titles Back in Print for 2014

    We are pleased to be putting several titles back into print this year.  Joyce McDougall’s Theatres Of The Mind and Nina Coltart’s Slouching Towards Bethlehem are both available now, with more titles to follow later in 2014. Read more…

  • New title published – Moving Pictures, The Making of ‘Letters to Sofia’ by Robert Mullan

    New title published – Moving Pictures, The Making of ‘Letters to Sofia’ by Robert Mullan

    In 2011, Englishman Robert Mullan began an almost impossible film project: namely, to finance and shoot a film in 3 languages -Lithuanian, Russian and Polish- neither of which he could read, write or speak. . He realized that the project would entail him shooting with Lithuanian actors, in various cities in Lithuania and Russia, and that he would then be preparing the film with English subtitles. But he was undeterred. The project had begun when, while working in Kaunas as a volunteer university lecturer in psychology, he discovered the relatively unknown Lithuanian artist and composer, Mikalojus Konstantinas Ciurlionis. This man produced over 300 paintings and sketches, composed over 300 musical pieces (including two symphonic poems), fought for the independence of his small nation from the control of imperial Russia, fell in love with a fellow activist and then died, tragically, at the young age of 35. So began the project. Mullan decided to keep a diary, not only to record day-to-day events and thoughts, but also to provide a guide as how not to finance and produce a feature film. The diary includes both amusing and less funny moments. For example, the crew’s encounter with Russian border guards as they entered the country to shoot some scenes in St. Petersburg; the endless problems with the translation of the script; endless arguments with co-producers; the endless quest for money and the continuing belief that funds would run out before the completion of the film; an unexpected diagnosis of cancer; magnificent music and startling paintings. The film was finally completed, edited in London and shown in Vilnius, Chicago and London. It is now about to be distributed internationally. Read more…